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Showing posts with the label craft

Craft Activity: Peanut Butter Pumpkin Dog Biscuits

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Valentine's Day isn't just about candy and hearts, don't forget your four-legged friends! They hike the trails and always greet you at the door. Children will also love being able to help make their four-legged friend a healthy treat. Plus the added bonus is a lesson in measurements. Gather all the ingredients first and let everyone involved take a turn, no matter how small. Even give a small portion of the dough to let the kids roll out and cut out the treats. For even more fun, use cookie cutters. Peanut Butter/pumpkin Dog Treats 1 1/2 cups flour 
(I use whole wheat) 1/2 cup peanut butter (no sugar and creamy)* the kind of peanut butter that is just peanuts, no salt or sugar  1/3 cup canned pumpkin puree add a little water if needed until the dough can form a ball Grain-free peanut butter/ pumpkin dog treats grind oatmeal into a flour and substitute for the whole wheat flour Preheat the oven to 350 F. Combine wet ingredients. Mix the flour into the wet ing

Recipe;: Making Snow Cream instead of Ice Cream (using fresh, clean snow to make ice cream)

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REPOST FROM JANUARY 2015: Living in a climate where it snows around 6 months out of the year, we either need to eat it or shovel it. Eating it is always the preferred way of using snow. This recipe for a homemade soft-serve ice cream is easy and fun. It doesn't store well so plan on making enough to eat immediately. My family doesn't seem to mind that they have to eat any leftovers. Enjoy! One quick and easy dessert that is a fan favorite is making a soft-serve ice cream out of snow and simple ingredients found in the fridge and pantry.

Craft: Making a Recycled Paper Corner Bookmark Tutorial and Print-out

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Looking for a rainy day activity  or have you lost your favorite bookmark? Don't dog-ear those pages, make a quick corner bookmark out of recycled materials. Enjoy reading your favorite books! Directions (print-out tutorial at bottom of page) 1) Cut out a 6" or 7" square piece of paper or use the tutorial print-out to the left. We have used old maps, children's artwork, candy wrappers, and catalogs as material for bookmarks. 2) fold in half diagonally: bring corner 4 to corner 1, fold along corners 2 and 3 to form a triangle pointing up. 3) Fold corner 2 to meet corner 1 and fold corner 3 to meet corner 1, crease along folds 4) turn the diamond 180º so flaps face down.  (See diagram) 5) Gentle open the flaps 6) in the center there will be folded lines forming a square. Fold the top layer Corner 1 up. 7) Refold corners 2 and 3 down to form the diamond shape. 8) Fold the top layer of Corners 2 and 3 to Corner 1. Crease at line 7. 9) Fold Fl

Crafts: Aldo Leopold Bench Plans

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Enjoy these simple plans for this simple bench that provides a perfect place to observe the natural world.  C onsidered by many as the father of wildlife management and of the United States’ wilderness system, Aldo Leopold was a conservationist, forester, philosopher, educator, writer, and outdoor enthusiast . “That land is a community is the basic concept off ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics.” Though his book, The Sand County Almanac is a must read, it may be something that can wait for anyone with very young children. For everyone else, it's a wonderful example of nature writing that is a timeless connection to the land. My family first made our first  "Leopold Bench" as a group effort at the Aldo celebration at the A dirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb, NY. It remains one our most comfortable outdoor benches. It also was a project that allowed us to work together. © Diane Chase, author of A dirondac

Solar Eclipse Moon Tracker Craft: See where the moon will move across the sun August 21, 2017

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There are numerous posts regarding the upcoming Total Solar Eclipse. Here is my own post from May that also targets the various seasonal full moons.  All the safety measures and warnings about wearing approved eclipse glasses are necessary. For anyone interested in creating a visual craft demonstrating where the moon across the East Coast and New York State during the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse, please feel free to print out the graphic I created using data from the NASA website .

FREE Activity: Print out this MOOSE coloring sheet and fun facts

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DID YOU KNOW? Moose are related to deer? The name "moose" is an Algonquin/Native American word meaning twig-eater • A male moose is called a bull • A female moose is called a cow • A baby moose is called a calf • The skin under the moose's neck is called a bell • Moose are herbivores. They eat plants • Moose are one of the largest animals in the Northern Hemisphere • Moose are excellent swimmers • Moose can eat 50-60 lbs of plants in a day!  Enjoy!  © Diane Chase is the author of the Adirondack Family Activities™ guidebook series , Adirondack Family Time™guidebooks have easy Adirondack family hikes, Adirondack swimming holes, Lake Placid Olympic activities, Adirondack trivia, Adirondack horseback rides, Adirondack snowshoe family trails and more. Look for the Adirondack family guidebook online or bookstores/museums/sporting good stores. Diane is currently working on the next Adirondack Family Activities™ guide.

Arts and Crafts: Tissue Paper Window Star Art

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It has been a long winter and any signs of spring seem to be still buried under three feet of Adirondack snow. If you are also looking out the window and want to bring some color and freshness to your house, try these delightful window star art projects. Remember arts and crafts are not just for kids, but for adults, too! I am a devout purchaser of craft books, Pinterest  and crafting with friends. My children are very patient with my struggles to try to make something affordable as well as beautiful. Tutorial for Tissue Paper Window Stars Materials: tissue paper, colored wax paper or any paper that is translucent, glue and tape  Cut tissue paper into rectangles. Fold eight rectangles in half length-wise. Open back up. Fold each corner in to meet the center fold line. Crease the corners.

FREE Activity: Learn to Tie A Bowline: Print out this KNOT TYING worksheet and fun facts

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Print out this KNOT TYING worksheet and fun facts Learn to Tie Knots: Bowline I always learned to tie a bowline with the "bunny around the tree" method. It seems to be a time honored system as now that is how my Adirondack kids have learned to tie this handy bowline knot. Enjoy! "THE BUNNY COMES OUT OF THE HOLE , GOES AROUND THE TREE AND GOES INTO THE HOLE" FUN FACTS:  1) The bowline has been used for over 400 years. It forms a xed loop at the end of a rope. 2) USES: hanging something around a tree like a hammock, pulling something up, lowering a package down 3) The short end (BUNNY) is called the working end while the long end (TREE) is called the standing end. 4) This knot won’t come undone while under stress but is still easy to undo. *WARNINGS: KNOTS ARE NEVER TO BE TIED AROUND PEOPLE OR ANIMALS AND ONLY USED WITH PARENTAL SUPERVISION Look for more family-friendly ideas on AdirondackFamilyTime.com © Diane and Tyler

Craft: Build a Toad House

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Are you overrun with toads?  Give them a home of their own. Here is a quick  Toad House  to make those warty creatures have a comfortable place of their own. Recycle old or broken terra cotta pots and get that toad settled in. Remember that toads can eat upwards of 1,000 insects in a day. They also eat grubs, slugs and bugs! © Diane Chase, author of  Adirondack Family Time: Tri-Lakes and High Peaks (Your Four-Season Guide to Over 300 Activities)  available  online  or bookstores/museums.

Recipe: Violet Foraging Makes Violet Syrup and Lemonade

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Picking the violets is a sweet job! Springtime means violets and lilacs. I love having an edible landscape. Violets are one flower that brings color to my recipes and with the right violet, they even bring a sweet, sweet scent. In the Adirondack Park where I live, the purple native violets do not give off any scent. Also called blue violets (Viola sororia) these violet flowers and new spring leaves are edible and full of Vitamin C. The flower of the common blue violet (Viola sororia) has five rounded petals and is unscented while the leaves are heart-shaped. These native plants can be tossed in a spring salad adding bright floral interest. The more fragrant English wood violets (Viola ordorata) are what is most commonly used for perfumes and essential oils have naturalized in some places. The purple violets in the Adirondacks are unscented The small white violets have a sweet scent! Though there is one native sweet violet (Viola blanda) in the Adirondacks that does

Craft: Get ready for Christmas with this Advent Calendar idea

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* All artwork and tutorials © Jenny B Harris, AllSorts From illustrator, designer and all around crafty lady,  Jenny B Harris of Allsorts  are these sweet and easy tutorials on how to make a "peppermint star," an advent calendar of pocket purses and even a little elf clog.  These were first loaded on her website in 2007 and we have used her tutorials to make  tiny purses for dolls, shoes and stars to hang from the sky.. because that is where stars come from (according to my daughter.) We even made elf shoes for "real" elves that would visit us at night.  We did find out that we didn't have elfin visitors but mice. My child was most disappointed to learn that in our world, at our house, mice do not wear clothes but eat shoes, felt and even the cupcakes we left on the counter.  Keep in mind that these are not my designs or artwork so if you copy or reuse, please give credit where credit it due...  (* All artwork and tutorials © Jenny B Harris, A

Craft: Electoral Voting Map - Color in Each State

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Remember to VOTE for President! Here is an Electoral Votes map. Help your children keep track of each state. Count the electoral votes and be able to explain the Presidential election process!

Craft: How to Make a Felt or paperclip Ice Skate Ornament

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My daughter was home sick today so she helped me make our latest Christmas felt ornament. We created two versions, one out of wool felt and the other out of paper. The felt version is a bit complicated, but not so challenging that my 11-year-old with a stomach bug couldn't complete it. The paper version is a great option for younger children who can use scissors and glue. Parents may still want to lend a hand, because it's fun to make together!

Spring Fever: Eight (8) Days of Nature Activities

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By Diane Chase During a change of season I am always a bit overwhelmed whether its a new school year, Christmas shopping and all those twinkle lights or springtime mud. Everyone needs to get outside so here are 8 days of nature activities to do with your family to clear your head, no matter what environment you live in. Day One:  Look at the sky. Simple you say but how many times do you work in an office all day, commute to your job, sit in your car, play outside but never look up at the sky. Take a look. What do you see? Stars? Clouds? A jet? My daughter saw a magic carpet and a mermaid. Yes, together. Day Two: Look down, get on your knees down low and look at the ground. Look past the concrete and other stuff and try to find the earth.  Yesterday you looked up and today you look down. That is what children look at all the time, whether they are just learning to walk or running around. Get down low today and see what you have been walking on all this time.

Craft: May Day Paper Cone and Traditions

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Happy May Day! Craft:  Make A May Day Basket: The tradition is for children to place a simple bouquet of flowers on the door of a friend or neighbor. What I enjoy is it gives children a chance to surprise adults and do something kind without costing a penny.  The "basket" can be as simple as a used tin can or glass jar with wire or twine for hanging.  The kids can go outside and fill the jar with lovely spring flowers. If you aren't in an area with fresh flowers about, make some tissue flowers for everyone to enjoy!  History: There are many traditions surrounding the first of May. Beltane was the name given to this time, on the Celtic calendar.  The name originates from the Celtic god,  Bel  - the 'bright one', and the Gaelic word 'teine' meaning fire, hence the name 'bealttainn', meaning 'bright fire'. May Day is the beginning of the 'lighted half' of the year when the Sun begins to set later in the evening

Gardening with Kids: Make Your Own Newspaper "Peat" Pots

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by Diane Chase A cost effective way to pot plants and recycle and reuse from your paper bin is to make newspaper "peat" pots that can be planted directly into the ground. It is an easy process and children enjoy the activity. it can be done on a rainy day, if you need something to do or make a family night out of the activity. Then plants your seeds or seedlings, water and wait for your indoor garden to grow! Continue for step-by-step directions

Craft: Make A Shamrock for St. Patrick's Day

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Make this easy shamrock to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. Write a message on it and give it to a friend. Make a whole bouquet for a table arrangement. Use a pipe cleaner for a stem and hang it from the door! Happy St. Patrick's Day! © Diane Chase, author of Adirondack Family Time: Tri-Lakes and High Peaks (Your Four-Season Guide to Over 300 Activities) for the towns of Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, Jay/Upper Jay, Wilmington, Keene/Keene Valley which is available online or bookstores/museums/sporting good stores. Diane is currently working on the second guidebook in the four-book series of Adirondack Family Activities.

Happy Pi (e) (314) Day!

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To celebrate National Pi(e) Day  on March 14, make your favorite dessert or this quick refrigerator magnet! Materials: bottle cap tooth pick small beads (the color of your pie.. red for raspberry pie, blue for blueberry pie) clear drying glue small magnet no larger than the back of the bottle cap small pieces of tan felt   Instructions • Using the bottle cap as a pattern draw and cut out a circular piece of felt (to use as the bottom crust) • Glue the "bottom crust" into the bottle cap. • Pour a small bit of glue into the bottle cap lined with felt and pour a small amount of the beads on top. • Mix the glue and beads together using the tooth pick. • Continue to add more beads and glue until the bead/glue mixture is level with the top of the bottle cap • Cut small strips of felt and glue over the beads, mimicking the top of a pie. • Let dry • glue small magnet to back of bottle top and let dry Place on fridge! This makes a great party favor that is easy a

Craft: Make a paper or felt fortune cookie

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The U.S. Greeting Card Association’s website states that about one billion valentines are sent worldwide each year. Not that I am not the sentimental type but most of the time cards end up in the recycling bin. Saving cards seems to create just one more thing to move. There are some items that I do keep that are only significant to me. So for anyone looking to create a different keepsake, here is a paper of felt fortune cookie. Paper or Felt Fortune Cookies Getting ready for Valentine's Day? Need a quick idea to make little treats for your children's friends? Use the template and follow the simple directions to make quick and easy fortune cookies.

Craft: Make an Fabric Wrapped Initial

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This week's craft is brought you you by Lauren at Goody-Goody *Handmade . She takes a simple piece of wire and shapes it free form to make this creative craft. This is something that can be done with children of all ages. You can use recycled materials and really let the creativity flow. Have  fun! Materials - paper wrapped wire (how about reuse: take an old wire hanger  - fabric scraps, cut into strips at least 1" wide. Length doesn't matter much. - glue gun - buttons, bits, beads and baubles - cord for hanging Diane Chase, author of Adirondack Family Time: Tri-Lakes and High Peaks (Your Four-Season Guide to Over 300 Activities) for the towns of Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, Jay/Upper Jay, Wilmington, Keene/Keene Valley which is available online or bookstores/museums/sporting good stores. Diane is currently working on the second guidebook in the four-book series of Adirondack Family Activities.