Adirondack New Year: "Auld Lang Syne" Lyrics and History

Auld Lang Syne is one of the most popular songs that nobody really knows the lyrics to. "Auld Lang Syne" literally translates as "old long since" and means "times gone by." Below are the lyrics with a bit of a translation for what I felt were the tricky parts. Happy New Year!

"Auld Lang Syne"
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne.

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup of kindness yet,
For auld lang syne!


And surely ye'll be your pint-stowp,
And surely I'll be mine,
And we'll tak a cup o kindness yet,
For auld lang syne!

We twa hae run about the braes, (run about the hills)
And pou'd the gowans fine, (and pulled up the daisies)
But we've wander'd monie a weary fit,
Sin auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn, (paddled in the stream)
Frae morning sun till dine, (from morning to dusk)
But seas between us braid hae roar'd (broad seas have roared between us)
Sin auld lang syne.

And there's a hand my trusty fiere,
And gie's a hand o thine,
And we'll tak a right guid-willie waught, (a good-will drink)
For auld lang syne.

Auld Lang Syne is one of the most commonly sung songs for English-speakers on New Year's eve, It is a Scottish song that was first published by the poet Robert Burns in 1796. Burns transcribed it after he heard it sung by an elder man from the Ayrshire section of Scotland, where Burns's originally hailed from.

Bandleader Guy Lombardo has been credited with popularized the song in America in the early 1930s, turning it into a New Year's tradition. There are written incidents of the song being sung as early as 1896 and various versions of the song are sung all over the world.

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