Color blind Test

Today is the first day of school for my now 1st and 4th graders. After doing a meet and greet with the 1st grade teacher, I moved along to my son's classroom. There is something disheartening to have to explain to a teacher that your child, who receives wonderful grades, thrives in school and enjoys learning is unable to distinguish between the red and green markers used on the Smart Board. Luckily, his teacher is amazing, thoughtful and willing to watch out for any issues.

For most people being colorblind (a misnomer) is never an issue. If anything, it should be more accurately called color deficiency. It only effects 8% of males typically of European descent and 1% of females.

The most common type is red/green from an inherited mutated X chromosome. Yes, he received that from me as well as his sparkling wit. My father carries the same trait and assures me that it never hindered him at all plus we were able to place blame on his fondness for mixing patterns and a flair for black socks with shorts.

At the age of two we knew something was up when my son "i spied" our golden retriever as something green.

There is no treatment for color blindness but nor is it considered a disability. Certain jobs will be eliminated for him, right out of the gate. He will never be an airline pilot, police officer or ship's captain. So far he has not expressed interest in any of the above.

For parents with children with a similar issue, take note of your child's classroom. Are the chalkboards green? Does the teacher use colored chalk for distinction? Will the teacher use a computer and LCD projector? Are the subject folders color coded? Are colored pencils labeled? It is amazing how we take for granted that we all see color the same way.

My son is frequently asked by his friends if he only sees in black and white. His response is the one we have taught him. He just sees color differently.



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